Saturday, December 10, 2005

Grade 10 Science Exam Review?

What topics are you worried about for the exam...
Do you have any specific questions?

155 comments:

ms.bearse said...

I suggest starting to review old notes and tests now, and do a little each day or each weekend. That will get your mind thinking about all that we have learned. Try to make connections among topics as much as possible. The more links you have, the easier it is to remember the material. I will be in the class at 11:30 each day so you can come ask for help at that time.

Cutler said...

ok, i am worried about bio as well, chem not so much, but after that last test i'm worried about physics as well. i mean, i should have gotten atleast taylors mark! that is my best subject! GGRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!

and good going on getting a spot where we can finaly contact you.

ms.bearse said...

I'll be working on making review questions, and they should be posted sometime early this week. Start reviewing early, and study a bit each day. Take your time on tests...everyone could benefit from reading the questions over carefully!
Hope your holidays are going well :)

Anonymous said...

I'm pretty much worried about the whole entire exam. I don't think I'm going to do horrible but I'm positive that I'm not going to do great! Exams always suck for me, so my average is going to go down! :(!

ms.bearse said...

For all eager students, there are now review pages posted (on the main SNC2D page) for biology, chemistry and physics, as well as a list of key terms that you should understand and be able to define. These review questions are a good start for exam preparation. There are other questions at the end of chapters in the text book, as well, you could go over your old tests. Don't get too stressed!

..o0o..Tasha..o0o.. said...

I have a suggestion for you webpage!!! The first unit test (Bio) is an icon thing you can click to get the test questions(and answers) can you make the other unit tests the same way? Or, is there a reason for not having them like that. I am bringing this up because this is one way i review for the exam.

ms.bearse said...

Thanks Tasha, that'll be my next project! Glad you're starting early. Have a happy new year.

Anonymous said...

Im pretty much just screwed for the exam .. so that sucks!! .. haha!!

Cutler said...

well, this weather is good sofar. nothing too hard, but to be honest i was expecting something alittle bit more like geography last year. aw well, eh?

ms.bearse said...

It wouldn't be good if everything was just a repeat of last year's classes would it? I'm glad it's not too hard yet.

Jackson said...

I cant beleive i went to your website, haha,

ms.bearse said...

Thanks for leaving a message Jackson. Glad you found the site, hope it was useful for you. Did you find the material from the days that you missed?

Anonymous said...

How does conduction occur? Why can't it happen in space?

ms.bearse said...

Some materials are good conductors because they can transmit thermal energy quickly. Imagine extending a coat hanger, and putting one end of it in a fire. The end in the fire will be receiving heat from the flames. The heat makes the metal particles move more. The particles in the end of the wire will collide with the particles beside them, and transfer their energy. The energy will be passed along all the way until you feel the coat hanger get warm in your hand. The heat travelled by conduction, particles colliding with each other and transferring energy.

Conduction can't happen in space because there are no particles in space. In space, heat is transferred through radiation.

Hope this helps.

Michelle said...

Hey Ms. Bearse!
Could you put the answers to the review up please! It would be a really great help!

Anonymous said...

I'm so worried about the exam but mostly because of physics. I'm still very lost in the graphing and yeah, just so confused :(

ms.bearse said...

Michelle, the answers are now up. Enjoy.

ms.bearse said...

Again, I'm asking all confused people to come get help at lunch! We'll work out some tutorial times on the other exam days as well. I want to help you learn. I'll be in the classroom at 11:30 tomorrow as usual.

Anonymous said...

Do we only have to review the just the exam review sheets that you handed out or should we review EVERYTHING?

ms.bearse said...

Start with the sheets, and old tests. Be sure you can do the physics questions and graphing. Practice the chemistry questions (balancing equations, knowing reaction types, nomenclature, acid base stuff). Read through biology (there are more terms/definitions there), know how to do food webs/chains etc. Think of all the connections you know. For weather consider the tests and quizzes a good place to start. Good luck!

cutler said...

ok ms. bearse. your going to be around in the morning, but what about people who dont want to go get help then hang around all day untill their other exams. not that its a problem for me, just thought i'd throw it out there.

ms.bearse said...

I'm going to be there in the mornings because that's what the class seemed to want (although nobody showed up today for any help). I'm going to end up being there most of tomorrow, in the morning because I said I would, and then in the afternoon helping some students with math and other things. If you find yourself wanting some help, or just to hang out in the science room, you are welcome to join us Cutler. If you, or anyone, find specific questions that you need help with, let me know what time is good, and I'll be there if I can. Hope the studying is going well. Let me know if you want some help.

Phil said...

im confused about ionic and covalent bonding ionic is where on element gives up a electron and covalent is where its shared Which is which

ms.bearse said...

Ionic bonding is when atoms gain or lose electrons in order to have a complete outer shell. This gives them either a positive or negative charge, and they are called ions. Ions will be attracted to each other so that the total charge of the compound will be 0. There has to be an equal amount of positive charges and negative charges in the compound. This happens between a metal and a non-metal. They are named with "metal non-metal-ide".

Covalent/molecular bonding is when atoms (both non-metals) share electrons so that each atom will have a complete outer shell of electrons. These compounds are named with the prefixes (mono, di, tri, tetra, penta, hexa, ...)

I'm glad you are getting your questions sorted out Phil. Keep working so hard. You can do well! Keep sending me questions :)

Anonymous said...

a rabbit accelerates constantly from rest at 1m/s [E] for a total displacement of 15 [E] how long did the acceleration last?

My friend gave me this question, and we can't figure out how to do it!!

ms.bearse said...

Ok, let's use algebra, mostly because I can't draw a graph in this comment box. It starts from rest, so v1=0. Acceleration is constant, and 1m/s^2[E]
a=1m/s^2[E]. Displacement is 15m[E]
d=15m[E]
so we don't know v2, and we don't know t.
the equations we could use in this question are a=(v2-v1)/t
d=v1t+(1/2)at^2
we know enough information to use the second equation to solve for t.
15=0(t)+(1/2)(1)t^2
15=0.5t^2
30=t^2
t=square root of 30=5.477=approximately 5.5s

So we solved it. The acceleration lasted approximately 5.5 seconds.

We could also be asked to find the final velocity of the rabbit. That would be done using the first formula. a=(v2-v1)/t
1=(v2-0)/5.5
5.5=v2-0
v2=5.5m/s [E]

So, although it wasn't asked, we have found that after the 5.5 seconds the rabbit will be travelling at 5.5m/s[E]

Devlin said...

What time are you going to be at school the day of the exam? I have some questions I need to ask you.

michelle and taralyn said...

Can you please post a list of the most important topics that we would need to review for the exam. It's easier for us to make study notes for the exam if we know what areas of each unit are the most important.

ms.bearse said...

Michelle and Taralyn, I have posted the curriculum document on the science page in the exam review. The basic topics, and details are all in there under the grade 10 academic section. You need to know about sustainability, and interactions within ecosystems, and cycles for biology. For chemistry, you need to know nomenclature, balancing equations, types of reactions, and acids and bases and indicators. For physics you need to solve problems with no acceleration, and also problems with constant acceleration, and make and interpret graphs. For weather, you need to know about the atmosphere, and how the global wind pattern is, weather at different lattitudes, local weather patterns (land/sea breeze, chinook, lake effect etc). The review sheets should help cover most of this. Good luck!

ms.bearse said...

I'll be at school around 8:00 or 8:15 on Monday. I have a meeting at 10:15, but I'll be back in the class after that is done to help out as well. See you then.

Anonymous said...

Hey Ms.Bearse what are the different tropihc levels from the highest to the smallest? and what kinds of animals will go in each category?

Anonymous said...

what is sustainability?

ms.bearse said...

autotrophs (producers)(green plants) are the first trophic level. The second trophic level is the primary consumers, the herbivores. The third trophic level is the secondary consumer, a carnivore. The fourth and fifth trophic levels would be higher carnivores (that eat the other carnivores). For more info, here is a good site

trophic levels

ms.bearse said...

Sustainability involves keeping a balance. If we cut down trees faster than they can be replanted and grow, then we will end up eventually being without trees, which will change the balance of CO2 and O2 in the atmosphere, and also erosion would increase etc. A similar problem is happening with us burning fossil fuels faster than they are naturally made. Eventually we will run out. If we hunt and kill all of a certain species without limits, then the species may become extinct because it can't reproduce as fast as we are killing it.

australia sustainability

Michelle said...

Ms. Bearse,
on the weather test one of the questions is, Expain the water cycle with a drawing to help you. Explain what heat transfer is involved...

By what heat transfer is involved, what is it?

Anonymous said...

what are the different cycles we need to know in biology? the nitrogen and carbon cycles and what else?

ms.bearse said...

heat transfer in the water cycle is during the process of evaporation (heat is transferred to the water, and it changes state from liquid to gas--this makes oceans and large bodies of water heat sinks), heat is also transferred in the process of condensation (heat is transferred from the water vapour to the atmosphere and the water cools and condenses--this makes the atmosphere another heat sink).

ms.bearse said...

cycles: water cycle, carbon cycle, nitrogen cycle

you also need to have an understanding of the conservation of mass, all matter, all atoms are recycled. This is one link between ecology and chemistry. We cannot create matter, it must be cycled also.

Anonymous said...

what is islandization and overharvesting ?

Anonymous said...

are we going to need to know much about pesticides?

ms.bearse said...

Overharvesting is when you take out things from an ecosystem faster than it can be produced.

Islandization is when ecosystems become split up into smaller pieces, or only small "islands" of habitat are saved. If islands are too small, then the population inside cannot be sustained--not enough food etc.

ms.bearse said...

pesticides-yes, you need to know about what they are, and why they might be used. You need to know what is bad about pesticides, and how that can lead to bioaccumulation. You should know about pesticide resistance (how some insects are genetically not affected by the pesticide, and they will reproduce, while the other individuals in the same species will be killed. Over several generations (small time for insects), the population will end up being mostly resistant to the pesticide). There's a good picture in the book to explain this.

Anonymous said...

what is Phenolphthalein?, Bromthymol blue?, and is cabage juice the universal indicator ?

ms.bearse said...

phenolpthalein and bromothymol blue are indicators. They change colour based on the pH of a substance. Cabbage juice is an universal indicator because it can change colour several times, so you get a better idea of the pH range of the substance
check out the picture at the bottom of this page to see more indicators and their colours in certain pH ranges
indicators

Anonymous said...

woo hoo exams .. i just love exams! hhaah ..

Josh said...

is there anything special about halogens? or are they just the group of elements second column from the right on the periodic table?

Josh said...

o is there anything special about alkaline metals, alkaline earth metals, noble gases, metals, non-metals...or are they just columns on the periodic table

Josh said...

which side of the periodic table are the metals on and which side are the non metals on?

Josh said...

I am completely lost with the whole nomenclature thing.
I understand how Litium and Flourine can go together to form Lithium Fluoride...but how do you use the elements in the middle on the periodic table???
If you cant explain it through the computer can u come early on monday and re-teach it to me?

ms.bearse said...

Good questions Josh. Metals are on the left side of the periodic table, and also in the middle. Non-metals are on the right side. You need to know that alkali metals are column 1, and that alkaline earth metals are column 2, and that halogens are the second last column, and noble gases are the last column.

You need to know that halogens tend to gain an electron so they will have a -1 charge when they are ions. Noble gases do not form ions since they have a full outer shell. Alkali metals tend to lose their single electron in the outer shell, so they will form an ion with a charge of +1. Alkaline earth metals will lose the 2 electrons in their outer shell, to form an ion with +2 charge.

Anonymous said...

what is conservation of mass?

Anonymous said...

Could you pleace explain the Nitrogen Cycle!

Josh said...

should i be paying a lot of attention on significant digits?

Josh said...

What happens in the exosphere?

Josh said...

are the global wind patterns the polar easterlies, the westerlies, and the trade winds?

Josh said...

what could you say about the weather at 90 degrees other then its cold?

Jordan said...

ok so i'm doin the review and i come up on the i think "binary compounds" and i don't have the note so when its like copper(III)iodite i dunno what to do... and i cant find the note.. what was it called?

ms.bearse said...

conservation of mass means that in a chemical reaction the combined mass of the reactants will equal the combined mass of the products. We cannot create matter, and we cannot make it disappear. If you react 3 grams of calcium with oxygen to produce 5 grams of calcium oxide, then 2 grams of oxygen must have been used in the reaction. (I made up the numbers for this example)

ms.bearse said...

nitrogen cycle in brief:
nitrogen in the atmosphere is not useable by plants. It can be converted into nitrates (useable form) by lightning, or by nitrogen fixing bacteria. The nitrates are used by the plant, and then
a) the plant dies and decomposes
b) the plant is eaten by an animal which dies
c) the plant is eaten by an animal which produces excrement.
in each case the nitrogen is returned to the soil, and will be converted into ammonia (NH3). Bacteria will convert the ammonia into nitrites (NO2 -), and the nitrites into nitrogen (N2).

That is one part of the cycle. Another part is that where the nitrates are not used, and turned directly into nitrites and back to nitrogen.

Nitrates can also be lost from the ground as they dissolve easily in rain water.

Nitrogen fixing bacteria can be found in soil and also in nodules on the roots of legumes.
Farmers rotate crops of legumes through their fields to increase the nitrate level in the soil. They also add fertilizer(decomposing material/manure) to the soil to add to the nitrogen cycle.

ms.bearse said...

don't worry so much about significant digits.

ms.bearse said...

the exosphere is the highest level of the atmosphere. In this level the atoms can "escape" into space. The density of gases in the exosphere is low. It is where many satellites orbit.

ms.bearse said...

global winds in the northern hemisphere are polar easterlies, the mid latitude westerlies, and the trade winds. There are also two jet streams that travel from west to east.

the climate at 90 degrees latitude (poles) would be cold and dry. In the summer, it is warmer than the winter due to the tilting of the Earth, and the longer days. The arctic is classed as a desert because there is limited precipitation. The winds travel south bringing the cold air from the arctic with it.

the weather (day to day conditions) can change.

ms.bearse said...

Nomenclature:
covalent (2 nonmetals) uses the prefixes mono, di, tri, tetra, penta, hexa, hepta, octa, nona, deca, etc.
this represents the number of a certain atom within a molecule. Example carbon dioxide (CO2)has one carbon atom, and two oxygen atoms in it. We don't say monocarbon dioxide, because for the first atom we assume it is "mono" unless otherwise stated. We can however have carbon monoxide (CO)

ms.bearse said...

nomenclature:
ionic
we know how ions form. We know that some atoms can form different ions. For example copper can have a charge of 1+ or 2+, iron can have a charge of 2+ or 3+ (this info is on the periodic table).

So, if we have CuO as our compound, and we are naming it, we first recognize that it is ionic (metal, nonmetal). We look up copper and oxygen on the periodic table and see that copper can be either Cu1+ or Cu2+, and that oxygen is 2- (because of it's column in the periodic table).

The oxygen has a 2- charge, that must be balanced by the copper. Therefore the copper must have a 2+ charge.

We call it copper (II) oxide because the copper has a 2+ charge.
-----
If we have Cu2O, we would notice that it takes 2 coppers to balance the oxygen's -2 charge. Each copper would then have a charge of +1.

This would then be called copper (I) oxide.

ms.bearse said...

There are notes on this posted on the chemistry notes section dealing specifically with nomenclature. Take a look at those, and let me know if you still have some questions.

chemistry notes

ms.bearse said...

Jordan, the notes are found under chemistry if you click on the "Nomenclature" link. I tried to explain some of it in the last response too.

Anonymous said...

Do we have to know things that we learned from the movies we watched?

ms.bearse said...

We need the info from the first few movies (the ecology ones), and from the weather movies. The predator ones were pretty cool, but you don't need to know those for the exam.

Anonymous said...

for the exam do we get a different periodic table than the one we've been using in class?

ms.bearse said...

the periodic table on the exam might be slightly different, but you'll still be able to see the possible ionic charges (which is what you really need).

Anonymous said...

yeah...i can't really find the periodic table we used so is there anyway of me getting one that has the charges on it?

ms.bearse said...

you can download the periodic table that we used. I have it posted on the chemistry notes page (click on "periodic table" and you'll get the .pdf)

chemistry notes

Taralyn said...

Ms.Bearse, can you help me/show me how to do question # 7 on the physics exam review .... im so confused!

Anonymous said...

What is the correct formula for sodium hydride?

Anonymous said...

What is Biomass?

ms.bearse said...

Question 7: Philip is riding his bike. He starts from rest, and accelerates for 10 seconds at 0.8m/s^2[E], then maintains a constant velocity for 30 seconds. He then slows down and stops, uniformly over the next 15 seconds.
v1=0m/s
v2 (after first acceleration)= ?
v3 (after slowing down)=0m/s
a1 (over the first 10 seconds)=0.8m/s^2[E]
a2 (over the last 15 seconds)=?
first time interval=10s
second time interval=30s
third time interval=15s

a) Determine his final velocity
it says that he ends up stopped, so his final velocity is 0m/s[E]

b) Determine his displacement while accelerating forward.
the forward acceleration happens within the first 10 seconds.
d=v1(delta t)+(1/2)(a)(delta t)^2
d=0+(1/2)(0.8)(10)^2
d=(1/2)(0.8)(100)
d=(1/2)(80)
d=40m
he travelled 40 m [E] while accelerating forward


c) Determine the final rate of negative acceleration.
we need to first determine the velocity that he was going before he slowed down
using the information from the first 10 seconds
v1=0m/s
a=0.8m/s^2
t=10s
v2=?
a=(v2-v1)/t
(a)(t)=(v2-v1)
0.8(10)=v2-0
v2=8m/s[E]
now we can use this to find the final acceleration.
v2=8m/s[E]
v3=0m/s[E]
t=15s

a=(v2-v1)/t
a=(0-8)/15
a=-0.533m/s^2[E]


d) What was his final displacement?
his displacement over the first 10 seconds was 40m. His displacement over the next 30 seconds is d2=v2(t) we use this because there is no acceleration
d2=8(30)=240m
d3=v1t+1/2(a)(t)^2
d3=8(15)+(0.5)(-0.5333)(15)^2
d3=120-60
d3=60m
total displacement=d1+d2+d3=40+240+60=340m[E]


e) What was his average velocity?
average velocity is total displacement/total time.
Vave=d/t
Vave=340m/55s
Vave=0.01818m/s[E]

ms.bearse said...

Sodium hydride is NaH
Na will form the ion Na+ and H will be the cation in this case, and be H-

Anonymous said...

Do we have to know why we airate our lawns because I don't remember doing that and someone from the other class had that on their review

ms.bearse said...

biomass is talking about the total mass of the dry organic matter in an ecosystem. For example, if you cut and dried all the grass in the ecosystem, you'd be able to take the mass of that large quantity as the biomass of the grass in that ecosystem. You could do the same thing for the insects, and the other animals.

In general, there will be more mass in plants needed to support the other animals, and it will continue up in a pyramid with the least mass in top carnivores. It is similar to the energy pyramids that we looked at.

ms.bearse said...

We aerate our lawns to help the nitrogen cycle. The bacteria that change nitrogen to nitrates need oxygen to work. We want nitrogen to be converted, so we aerate (poke holes in/stir up the soil etc) our lawns to allow the bacteria to have oxygen.

If there is no oxygen, the denitrifying bacteria will be working (they don't need oxygen to work). They turn nitrates back to nitrites and to nitrogen. If we didn't aerate the lawn, the nitrates would not be produced as well, and some of what would be produced would be converted back to nitrites and nitrogen before they could be used.

Josh said...

When doing the Covalent Nomenclature what does the (g),(s), and (aq) mean? and are they important?

ms.bearse said...

(s) is solid, (g) is gas, (aq) is in solution in water (aqueous). The only thing that changes in the nomenclature is things like HCl which is hydrogen chloride, and HCl(aq) which is hydrochloric acid. HF is hydrogen fluoride, HF(aq) is hydrofluoric acid.

Josh said...

what time will you be at the school tomorrow?

Anonymous said...

Can you recommend any study tips for memorizing the phyiscs equations, or do you know any ways to make it easier! I don't have a very good memmory, and im afraid I won't remember them at all.

Anonymous said...

One of our multiple choice questions was, if A has 2 electrons in it's outer layer and B has 7 electrons in it's outerlayer then what is it's compound formula...adn the answer was AB2(subscript 2) how come its not A7B2

Josh said...

Are we only going to have to know about velocity-time graphs, and position-time graph???

Anonymous said...

What is the difference between nitrates and nitrites?

Josh said...

Physics
is the area under the line on a graph the displacement in a velocity time graph or a position time graph?

ms.bearse said...

Josh, I'll be there around 8 or 8:15 on Monday morning. I'll be in the classroom helping you guys, but I have a meeting at 10:15. After my meeting I'll be back helping you guys again.

ms.bearse said...

How to memorize physics equations:
One way is to understand the graphs and realize that acceleration is the slope on a velocity time graph. Slope is rise/run. Velocity is on the y axis, so the change in velocity would be the rise, and time is on the x axis so change in time would be the run.

You could also memorize the triangle
^
/ \
/delta v\
________
/a delta t\
____________

to calculate with a triangle, you need to remember where each variable is inside the triangle. Then, if you want to calculate what a equals, cover up the variable a with your finger. You will be now looking at delta v/delta t. so we know the formula is a=delta v/delta t
similarly you can discover that delta t=delta v/a
and that delta v=a(delta t)
-------
If you are dealing with constant velocity (no acceleration), then you can use a different triangle.
^
/ \
/delta d\
__________
/v delta t\
____________
from this triangle you can see that v=delta d/delta t
delta t=delta d/v
delta d=v(delta t)
THIS IS ONLY WHEN THERE IS NO ACCELERATION
-------
The longer formula that you will need to know is how to calculate displacement. Remember that displacement is the area under the velocity time graph. There can be a rectangular area as well as a triangular area that are added together. If you can draw the graph and calculate the areas then you don't have to worry about the formula. Otherwise, you just need to memorize it.
d=v1delta t+1/2a(delta t)^2
I recommend memorizing those triangles and that longer equation, and writing it on the front of your exam first thing when you sit down.

ms.bearse said...

One of our multiple choice questions was, if A has 2 electrons in it's outer layer and B has 7 electrons in it's outerlayer then what is it's compound formula...

Each B needs to accept one of A's electrons to have a full outer shell.

A has 2 electrons to donate, so 2 B's are needed to accept the electrons (one for each B).

Since we have 1 A and 2Bs, the formula would be AB2

ms.bearse said...

Josh, you need to know about velocity time graphs and position time graphs.
* slope of a position time graph is the velocity
* slope of a velocity time graph is the acceleration
* area under the curve of a velocity time graph is the displacement

ms.bearse said...

Nitrates come from nitric acid. Nitric acid is HNO3. When the ions separate, there will be an H+ ion and an NO3 - ion. The NO3 - ion is the nitrate.

Nitrites come from nitrous acid. Nitrous acid is HNO2. When the ions separate, there will be an H+ ion and an NO2 - ion. The NO2 - ion is the nitrite.

Nitrates are the form of nitrogen that is useful for plants. Nitrates can however be turned into nitrites by denitrifying bacteria, and then changed back into atmospheric nitrogen.

Teagan said...

How is rain formed?

Anonymous said...

the tradewinds in the northern hemisphere are northern tradewinds, are the tradewinds in the southern hemisphere called southern tradewinds?

Anonymous said...

What is atmospheric pressure?

Anonymous said...

what is a biome?

Anonymous said...

What does a combustion reaction look like?

Michelle said...

Should we know about the connections between the weather unit and the other units for the exam?

Anonymous said...

what is bioaccumulation? and do we need to know alot about it for the exam? .. what about bioamplification?

Josh said...

Are we going to have to know a lot about the connections between each unit?

Anonymous said...

when calculating acceleration does the unit of time used in the velocity need to be the same as the unit used to mesure the time?

Anonymous said...

how do you find the displacement of an object that is accelerating?

ms.bearse said...

Rain is formed from moisture within clouds. Clouds form when water condenses on dust, pollen and pollution in the air. As more and more water droplets condense, the droplets grow, and eventually will fall as rain.

ms.bearse said...

winds are named based on the direction that they come from. The trade winds in the northern hemisphere are called the north easterly trade winds. In the southern hemisphere, they are called south easterly trade winds, since they originate in the south east.

ms.bearse said...

atmospheric pressure is the force that the air is putting on each square meter of the Earth. It is 101.3kPa. kPa is kilopascals. One kilopascal is 1000 pascals. Atmospheric pressure can rise or fall depending on the weather systems.

ms.bearse said...

a biome is the collection of similar ecosystems around the world. They are determined due to climate conditions which influence the vegetation growth, and also the other organisms that can live there. Examples of biomes are the tundra, or savannah, or boreal forest, or rain forest.

ms.bearse said...

Combustion reaction:

compound that contains carbon and hydrogen reacts with oxygen, to form carbon dioxide and water.

Incomplete combustion will also have carbon and carbon monoxide as products.

ms.bearse said...

The connection between units is always a good thing to be mindful of. It may come in handy on the exam, or it might not, but it will come in handy in your life, and your overall knowledge and understanding of how the world works.

ms.bearse said...

bioaccumulation/bioamplification/biomagnification all have to do with chemicals that are fat-soluble building up within an organism due to it's environment, and also due to what it eats. Because the compounds are not soluble in water, they cannot be eliminated from the organism through urine or sweat. DDT, and mercury are examples of chemicals that can build up within an organism.

ms.bearse said...

when calculating acceleration the units should all match up. The units for velocity (m/s) and the units of time (s). This will give us m/s^2 as our final units.

ms.bearse said...

displacement of an object that is accelerating is found
a) from the area under a velocity time graph
b) from the formula d=v1(delta t)+1/2(a)(delta t)^2

Anonymous said...

for physics and the triangle thing does it go:
delta v
delta a, delta t?
and how do you use the trangle thing?

Anonymous said...

are we going to be given the physics formula on the exam?

ms.bearse said...

you need to memorize the physics equations for the exam

Anonymous said...

Is the exam cancelled? Do we write it on Wednesday, since the buses are cancelled?

ms.bearse said...

I'm not sure what happens, thanks for letting me know about the busses though! Usually teachers get a call to let them know what's going on. I'll leave a message here if/when I find out.

ms.bearse said...

Just got a phone call. Exams scheduled for today will be written on Wednesday. The schools are open, and teachers will get there when they safely can.

Anonymous said...

OMG this suck .... now we have to wait until wednesday :( ... of all the days to have a snow day .. ha

ms.bearse said...

Take the opportunity today to study! I'll be at the school for the morning, if you want to walk over and do some science....(I'd totally understand if you stay home though)

Josh said...

will you be at the school wednesday morning?

ms.bearse said...

I'll be at the school Tuesday morning 8:30-10, and then on Wednesday morning 8:30 until the exam.

Josh said...

okay so the exam is on wednesday?

ms.bearse said...

Yes Josh, the exam is on Wednesday, in the afternoon. If you still have more questions send them my way. I'm glad you are working so hard to do well.

Anonymous said...

What steps of the Carbon Cycle should we know?

Anonymous said...

why do we need pesticides

Anonymous said...

Why are all atoms recycled?

Megan C. said...

hey ms Bearse!.. are you going to be at school tomorrow morning?... i got a question about one of the questions on an old physics test...

ps. Im going to FAIL

Anonymous said...

should we know the proof of a chemical change?

Anonymous said...

should we be paying attention to converting?

Michelle said...

on the first physics test, question 18, how do you get the average velocity?

Anonymous said...

How much time do we get to do the exam and what is it out of, if you can tell me that?

Anonymous said...

ms. bearse, I'm so confused about something. Number 7 on the exam review vwuprfpart b) you had to determine his displacement. I don't understand how after you figured out the formula d=v1(delta t)+ 1/2(a)(delta t)^2, how'd you get to
d=0+(1/2)(0.8)(10)^2
because you got rid of the delta t so i'm confused!?!

Anonymous said...

: (

ms.bearse said...

For the carbon cycle, you should know photosynthesis, cellular respiration, how carbon is stored organically and inorganically (peat, fossil fuels, rocks, CO2 in atmosphere and CO2 dissolved in oceans), you need to know combustion as well.

ms.bearse said...

We need pesticides to eliminate pests. Some organisms transmit disease to humans (eg. mosquitos) so we use pesticide to reduce the mosquito population and save human life.

We also need to eat, so we use pesticides to protect our crops from being eaten by insects or other organisms.

Those are two reasons, can you think of more?

ms.bearse said...

Megan, I'll be there around 8:30. You can find me either at the science office, or in the classroom. I'll be glad to help you out, and no you're not going to fail...have confidence in your knowledge and your skills. You'll do fine! Sleep well tonight. :)

ms.bearse said...

you should know proof of chemical change.

ms.bearse said...

all atoms are recycled because there are a fixed number of carbon atoms that we have on Earth. They form parts of different molecules at different times, but they are still carbon. Imagine the carbon in the carbon cycle, it goes around and around the cycle. That is what I meant by "recycled".

ms.bearse said...

you should know how to convert metric things, and converting from km/h to m/s etc.

You should also have a grasp of what units go with what quantities.

For example, you know that 5m/s^2 would be an acceleration because of the unit m/s^2

You'd know that 5m[E] would be a displacement because of the unit.

ms.bearse said...

First physics test #18 average velocity is from total displacement/time, and average speed is total distance/time

ms.bearse said...

Number 7 b) you had to determine his displacement. I don't understand how after you figured out the formula d=v1(delta t)+ 1/2(a)(delta t)^2, how'd you get to
d=0+(1/2)(0.8)(10)^2
because you got rid of the delta t so i'm confused!?!
we know that v1=0m/s, a=0.8m/s^2, delta t=10 so then we substitute...
d=(0)(10)+(1/2)(0.8)(10)^2
d=0+(1/2)(0.8)(10)^2
and so on...
clear?

ms.bearse said...

I'll be at Frontenac helping out until the exam, so if you have any last minute questions, your best bet is to meet me in our classroom, and ask them in person.

Best of luck to all!

David said...

Wow...No more Bearse...How depressing, Well, I know that this is extremely late but. You were a really good teacher and it is amazing how you managed to put up with me and cutler through the entire year, that is impressive. Hopefully you'll get back into FSS for our grade 11 physics or chemistry so we can have you again some time. Again, REally fun in your class, thanks for that

ms.bearse said...

Hey David, Hope your semester 2 is going well. You're going to sign up for lots of science next year, right? I may be back at Frontenac, but no promises. Who knows, I may even be there this semester as a supply teacher.

David said...

That would be exciting, i am going for physics and chemistry. Not biology cause there is other stuff i want to do, and i am no good at it. You should try to get those two for next year. right next to eachother so it would just be sitting in the same room. It would be great. Anyways, i have to go write about the............exciting(sarcastic) subject of civics.

ms.bearse said...

Have fun with civics Dave, good to hear from you. I'm glad you're going to tackle 2 of the sciences next year. Best of luck.

Anonymous said...

hey, i dunno if this is where u meant for me to type things about science... but yeah. here is one of the questions:

lithium oxide and water ( write the word equation)

carbon dioxide and water ( write the word equation)

potassium and oxygen ( write the word equation)


yeah.... i dunno what we are suppose to to. many thanks. kiran.

ms.bearse said...

Lithium oxide and water
Li2O + H2O--> 2LiOH
we know when a metal oxide reacts with water it will form a base :)

this is all balanced, so we can write that lithium oxide and water will make lithium hydroxide.

word equation: lithium oxide+water->lithium hydroxide

Carbon dioxide and water
CO2 + H2O-->H2CO3
we know when a nonmetal oxide reacts with water it will form an acid

This is all balanced, so we know that carbon dioxide and water will make carbonic acid.

word equation: carbon dioxide+water->carbonic acid

potassium and oxygen
4K + O2-->2K2O
potassium and oxygen react to make potassium oxide

word equation: potassium+oxygen gas->potassium oxide

make sense?

Anonymous said...

yep yep. thanks a billion. thats more clear. kk back to studying. we got our exam tomorrow. :(

Nicole said...

Wow...what a big list of questions.

And you guess it- I couldn't find mine...*sigh* So I'll ask it. Pwease?

How do wind and ocean current affect tropical rainforests? I really just don't know.

Nicole, the calculator destoryer of math and all round klutz :)

Ms.Bearse said...

for extensive rainforest information try here
I like this "cook book" approach...don't know if it is helpful, but check it out here

I found a definition of rainforest that is interesting
rainforest
Dense forest usually found on or near the Equator where the climate is hot and wet. Moist air brought by the converging trade winds rises because of the heat and produces heavy rainfall.

I hope this helps you...do you still have an exam? I hope you do well.

Nicole said...

Good morning,

Yes it does help,thank you very much.

Yes I do have more exams...two actually (science and geography) today.

Again much thanks,

-Nicole

Dave said...

ahh.... I remember taking this course. Good times :) You probably don't remember me but i was one of your annoying students at frontenac 2 years ago. hehe

Ms.Bearse said...

Dave! How could I forget you....My dad works for your dad (or something like that)

What's up with you now? Are you still in Edmonton? Do you have great plans for university next year?

I worked at Frontenac last semester teaching French. It was strange to go there and see all the silly grade 10s all grown up and ruling the school as grade 12s. It was strange to see Cutler but no Dave.

It's great to hear from you. Best of luck for your final month and a half of high school.

Ms. Bearse